<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” data-lang=”en”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>&#39;The great escape&#39; of the <a href=”https://twitter.com/HitachiUK”>@HitachiUK</a> Sumo Fighters from the <a href=”https://twitter.com/hashtag/esconfs?src=hash”>#esconfs</a> hall. <a href=”http://t.co/IxPTmflzXS”>pic.twitter.com/IxPTmflzXS</a></p>&mdash; Jokin Aspiazu (@JokinAspiazu) <a href=”https://twitter.com/JokinAspiazu/status/537751852985905153″>November 26, 2014</a></blockquote>
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This photo was taken at Eurostar 2014. I had lent the test lab some of my Big Trak robots. I use these robots in my workshops as a way to help explain what software testing can do, and how we discover unknowns. Someone decided it would be fun to place the Sumo Wrestlers onto the top of BigTrak and drive them around. It’s a great photo, and it represents contemporary ideas with a scientific mindset. Something we strive for at Testing Times.

This robot exercise is based on the work by David Klahr and his work on experimentation. This is described in his book “<i>Exploring Scie<img class=”wp-image-3251 alignleft” src=”http://testingtimes.com.au/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2017/03/davidklahr.jpg” alt=”David Klahr- Exploring Science” width=”130″ height=”203″ />nce: The Cognition and Development of Discovery Processes” . </i> I have used repeated this exercise in many software testing workshops and tutorials. Probably the most enjoyable was at CAST2014 in New York. The tutorial attendees assisted in writing up a paper on the experiments which was published in <a href=”http://media.wix.com/ugd/c47e45_3848407c099e4e03a8cee8497b26dec0.pdf”>Tea Time with Testers in November 2015</a> – you can read the <a href=”https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FX0jKTUsd5FmZ1YnaHwFWCnkJgatRwHMvKlXFtRdIgw/edit?usp=sharing”>full article here</a>.

<em>Many thanks <a href=”https://twitter.com/JokinAspiazu”>Jokin Aspiazu</a> took this photo </em>